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demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we had john from day -- daily show helped us. and nothing is better except being in a book store on a friday night. so i pity all of us, really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all, it will be the most important thing i'll say all night, and thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downtown hill, and some of the specific thank yous to the end. we're here too talk about "fifth assassin." and people ask me where the book came from. no one gets crazeyear e-mail than me. no one gets more proof that abraham lincoln is gay than me. the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the -- i have to ask first. not here? then let's talk about him. here's what happens. i'm not dish promise you this is true. i was standing right of the and he comes top me early and says, brad, you want to see he holy grail? and he ah has crazy eyes and i'm like, you brought the holy gra
is moving in in strange ways. it used to be said that books were written for the general reader. now they're written by the general reader. .. eager to join in dialogue about where we as a nation find ourselves in this drive towards freedom and it seems particularly fitting that we would have this conversation today, the day after the nation paused its daily business to pay tribute to reverend martin luther king, jr.'s life and legacy. and it seems fitting that we would have this conversation the day after the nation's first black president was sworn in for his second term. i know much of the nation has already moved on, and president obama's rhetoric about the promise of america, life, liberty, justice, equality for all has already been forgotten by many, and i know that many people in america will not think of dr. king again until his holiday rolls around again next year. but i would like to us to pause to night and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach the nation's present. it seems important to do that given that this year marks
and historian michael beschloss. .. and a now, it starts and moves forward and cuts us off from any access to african history, which was not what woodson in tended. and so, we obviously owe the peopleof our higher to and so we obviously of the who d those who are descended from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owed them something for that, but we owe them the story of themselves. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good, sound psychological health, on ashes and obliterated history. when i was a child in richmond, virginia, weiss to have this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a
just single, contact to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early-morning hours of august at akkad, following negotiations and promises iraq's dictator, saddam hussein not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded it stressed and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. within three days, 120,000 iraqi troops with 850 tanks have poured into kuwait and moved south to threaten saudi arabia. >> in my direction, elements of the 82nd airborne division as well as key units are juicy keen of no one friend or fellow and no one should underestimate our determination to confront aggression. >> our objectives in the persian gulf are clear. our goal is to find and familiar. iraq must withdraw from kuwait completely, immediately and without conditions. [applause] these goals are not ours alone. they've been endorsed by the united nations security council five times in as many weeks. most countries share our concern for principal and many have a state in the stability of the persian gulf. this is not a saddam hussein would have it, the united states against iraq. it is iraq against the world. >>
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
to move along to get to all the features and get us started what i want to introduce the mastermind of today's event, i've learned today one of four curators of photography and i am sure they're all here. it is my pleasure to turn the program over to verna curtis. [applause] >> thank you very much, we're all in this together. i am not the mastermind. we have brigitte freed the widow of the photographer of the book "this is the day" the march on washington" which we are celebrating. the also have michael eric dyson and paul farber here with us for a special kind of conversation. i will tell you about each individual quickly because time is of the essence and i would like to tell you brigitte freed said she met leonard freed 1956 in rome and lived and varied in amsterdam when they left for the united states in 1963 a few months before that would be the march on washington. i don't think they knew that was about to happen. she printed leonard's photographs over 20 years including those in the book black and white america and made in germany and the internationally acclaimed exhibitions
next year. but i would like for us to pause tonight and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach us about our nation's president. it seems particularly important for us to do that given that this year marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years have passed since his voice soared over the washington monument, declaring his dream "i have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream." yesterday while i was watching president obama's inaugural address, i heard echoes of king's speech i have a dream. and when i turn off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting on the question are all of us truly welcome to share in this dream come the same dream that dr. king dreamed? most americans i am sure can be cite portions of dr. king's i have a dream speech by heart. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech i've grown accustomed to hearing clips of his speech played over and over are cycled over and over on the radio every january. they are the favorite quotes, the favorite lines. and now that i h
be clear. [laughter] [applause] . . we had john hodgman from "the daily show" who came out and helped us to it. being in a bookstore on a friday night people, okay so all of us really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all and it will be the most important thing i say tonight is thank you. everything i say after that we'll be will be straight downhill and i will tell you some of this is a big thank yous to the end. but we are here to talk about is the "the fifth assassin." people say what you where do you get your ideas for the book? i will tell you about this. nobody gets crazier e-mailed to me. the last time i was asked at the store for the inner circle someone brought me the holy grail. is that guy here? i have to ask first. he's not here? then let's talk about him because here's what happened. i promise you this is true. there was standing right of there and he comes up to me earlier and he is like red, do you want to see the holy grail? he had the crazy eyes going back and forth and i'm like you brought the holy grail all the way to barnes & noble how do i not say
, it used to be an army research facility. and what they used to do is if you were shot in the civil war and you died, and you got shot in the arm and you died, they would awe off your arm and send -- saw off your arm and send it to the research place and say figure out why you died. they couldn't figure it out. so they kept sawing off body parts parts and sent it off to this museum. they realized at germ therapy develops the reason you're dying is because of infections, blood poisoning. and when they figured that out, they now realize, they say, wait, we're going to turn this research facility into a museum. and he said to me that the smithsonian has dorothy's ruby red slippers, we got all the body parts. and that's a party, right? and they have, what happened was when lincoln was shot and they did the autopsy and they took his brain out, the bullet fell from his brain, clinked into the sink, and that's how they found it. when the assassins were killed, people love the assassins in an odd, creepy way. they were almost like saints, they wanted pieces of them. so they used to cut the lini
to most of us. bell about sharing one of your typical days at the court. >> when i say it most of you won't want the job. [laughter] you know, we have spent most of our base reading. we read briefs. we read amicus briefs which are by the court. we read the record that has been created below, the decisions of courts across the country who have faced the question. we then research and we right in we right and then we added. and almost every day we are reading research and writing. it does not sound very exciting. then our opinion gets published. all of that thinking gets shown to the world. and it is what people look at. they don't really realize how much we have to do to get their, and it is work to get there, hard work. and remembering that every decision we make their is a wonder and their is a loser. if they don't like what we have done the don't think we're smart. they think really is a. they think we are doing it based on policy. the somehow we just don't like what they like. it is so far from the truth. judging is a skill, a profession . you are trained to look at issues in a legal w
china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asymmetry. and you find i
assassin," including his examination of the four people who have successfully assassinated u.s. presidents. it's about 40 minutes. >> so a couple, let me count it, one, two, three, four, five -- fourteen days ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me.
are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why priests. the savannah book festival part of three days of booktv this president's day weekend on c-span2. >> n
and our friends across the country joining us on televisiotelevisio n. thank you for joining us. [applause] i am excited that mayor denise parker and -- are here with us tonight. [applause] denise parker is one of my heroes, one of my favorite people and a touristic mayor. please stand mayor and first lady cathy. [applause] you can see past presentations of the progressive forum on our web site, great minds such as jane goodall, richard leahy, bill moyers and supreme court justice john paul stevens. go to our web site at progressive form houston.org. that is progressive forum houston.org. we are pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket in the distribution table in the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by the bookshop. after justice sotomayor's presentation presentations you would join me for a q&a. i should say a supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present or future but we will delve deeply into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books, and greet fans in the grand foyer. i crie
us at twitter.com/booktv. >> you're watching booktv. next, jeffrey engel talks about his book, "into the desert," a collection of essays by journalists, government officials, and scholars that look back on the events in the impact of the 1990-91 gulf war. it's about an hour 20 your. >> doctor jeffrey engel is the founding director of the presidential history project at southern methodist university, until the summer of 2012, he served as the class of 52 a.m., professor at texas a&m university in the bush school. so we are pleased there here as well. that you very much for the support you've given to jeffrey engel and to the bush school in texas and them. when jeff was in texas a&m county was the dreck of programming for the institute and is a graduate of cornell university. additionally, studied at saint catherine's college, oxford university, and received his ph.d in american history from university of wisconsin at madison. he served as an postdoctoral fellow in international security studies at yale university. his books include "cold war at 30,000 feet,." he received a pretty sign
in the u.s. capitol, and like all tourists, the very first thing i did when i came to washington, d.c. was to take a tour of the national mall. but when i got there i noticed something. if you just came to washington, d.c., and just went to the national, you almost believe african-americans never lived in the city. i went from one end of the mall to the other from the capitol all the way down to the lincoln memorial looking for the african-american history of washington, d.c.. and i could barely find anything. i said to myself that can't be true. i know there's african-american history in the city. it has to be african-american history of the national mall. maybe no one has bothered to sit and find out what it is and that's how this book came about. starting in the u.s. capitol, i needed my goal to find out what the african-american history of the national mall and this book is the result. i'm going to take a few minutes here today to talk about some of the things i discovered not only about the national mall, but about washington, d.c. as a city. some things i open interest you and
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
>> at now, peter andreas talks about the long history of smuggling in the u.s. from which prior to the revolutionary war, was stricken by a desire to curb domestic indices and bypass import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> at afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies for the discussion a peter andreas' new book, "smuggler: how illicit trade made america." housekeeping i have to mention some things. the way we are going to run assist fathers. to do with brief introduction and then peter will talk about the book because obviously we need to say something a context than most of you have not read the book would be a one-way conversation. i will invite catherine richard and james to say their piece on the boat and hopefully we can get stuck in a good position. after that we will open up for q&a. you will see one fixed microphone there and another vocal microphone for the site of the house. if you wish to join q&a, get up and stand behind the microphone. we have to do it this way because they are so mobile is for recording c-span a
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
.. there were no towns, and i could see us just sitting their like we had forever so we started playing out camps to build rangers. so you have to understand the context of my level of where we were triet after two tours of vietnam combat a was to be a soldier because we had done all these things in vietnam and the only thing we knew is when we went to the gulf war we were so good and the reagan dollars and what happened to america's military i remember being asked after the war by several think-tank groups that came in to talk about me. did you worry about where the enemy was? i didn't care. i just want to know what they were because it would be any that we ran into. it's been lost of where we were and what was going on at the different levels and never seeing any of these briefings. never seeing any of these briefings september, october, november. we didn't really know we were going to attack iraq sometime in december. we were defending saudi arabia and wasn't until sometime in december that we started working at shortstop's level they were on to offensive war planning but not
. to these guys believe what they're saying? sitting in that chamber the u.s. house of representatives, listening to a heated debate, we asked that question about our republican colleagues. we usually thought the answer was no, but if so, they were phenomenally good actors. their arguments made no sense to us. such well-known phrases as tax cuts paid for themselves. we will be welcomed as liberators. climate change is improving and government-run health care does not work. repeated over and over again. republican arguments along these lines seem incomprehensible to democrats, just as ours seemed misguided to them. the evidence that medical tests made no difference to them. free-market principles that they took as given conflicted with the information that we took every day from our constituents, and the economists that we consulted. news media preoccupation with lack of stability makes -- missed the point. i traveled of republican members of congress to the middle east and enjoy their company. we worked out together in the house gym. still, more time socializing with each other would not have clo
because jess is going to give us a good taste of what he's been writing about. but i did want to introduce jess, the person. he's someone i got to know a few years ago when we were both traveling from washington, d.c. to to williamsburg, and the train, amtrak broke down, and we grabbed a car and rode down together and had just an extraordinarily enjoyable time because jess is, as i think most people know, one of the leading legal reporters in the united states. but what they may not know is his, you know, he's a person of extraordinary humor and wit. and so i want to expose a little bit of that to you right now because when he was in college at harvard, he was roommates with, what, peter say gal of, wait, wait, don't tell me. and they were both members of not -- they were not the harvard crimson crowd, they were the harvard lampoon along with the head of the lampoon at that time, conan o'brien. i've been told this elaborate story, i'm not sure i'm going to be able to get all the details right about he and his cronies contriving to arrange an invitation to harvard to speak as a pan of lette
of soviet affairs argues that our current level of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on booktv. >> thank you for that introduction, and thank you for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things about why wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, the secretary of defense made it known before he announced that he was going to lead the administration that he was going back to the state of washington. he was someone i follow closely. he was nominated to be the cia director in 1991, and as an obama supporter, i was shocked to find out that he was going to be kept on as the secretary of defense. what he told people, i found, and it was a major reasoning for why i wanted to write this book, what he said is that we are moving towards a smaller military. one that will do fewer things than be able to go fewer places, which he thought was a terrible thing and he added that he didn't want to be a part of that kind of a system that is going to retrench. my feeling has always been that we need a sm
for participating we will try to get your next questions. thank you for being with us live. if you are in c-span or highland park figure for joining us and those who came to be a part of us as well. also your publishers and your support helps the public bringing great authors like this. >> this bookstore which i discovered a few years ago is a national treasure and enormously important. i am thrilled we got to do this here. >> you heard gramm smith was here for abraham lincoln vampire hunter andrews said i need to follow that up. >> that is where i got the idea to launch here. [laughter] >> i think the staff and without you we could not make these shows success to. [applause] >> thank you very much it is the pleasure to be here, i am honored to deliver the lecture. my greatest books, i have to confess it is my only book. [laughter] i spent 30 years going to saudi arabia as day editor talking to officials about oil, iraq, iran, u.s., geopo litical issues. when i return all -- retired from the "journal" one thing i was interested in doing with my new found time was trying to understand saudi
. and this morning he's going to talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." with that, turn it over to you, max. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve, for that warm and generous introduction, and thank you also for your many years of service, and i see a lot of folks who are either current and active duty or retired military, and i thank all of you for your years of service to the nation. what i'm here to talk about today is the contents of my new book, which as steve mentioned, is a history of ger guerrilla warfare. and although it may seem thick and daunting at first glance, i did try to tell a good story. it sort of encapsulated 5,000 years of guerrilla warfare history into one book. now, that may seem like a formidable undertaking, but here today in front of your very eyes, i'm going to do something that is even harder; i'm going to try to encapsulate the entire book into about a 25-minute talk. [laughter] so that's going to work out to about 200 years per minute. sofassen your -- sofassen your seat belts, we're going to go on a historical journey here. i'm going to talk about the origi
afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our auditorium. please welcome those are joining us on all of these occasions honor heritage.org website, for those inside -- in the house. please make sure cell phones are turned off. we will post the program within 24 hours honor heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting where the debate is doctor bucci, director of our center for foreign policy studies. he previously served heritage a senior research fellow for defense and homeland security. is well-versed in the special area operations and cybersecurity areas as well as defense support to civil authorities. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in july 2001 coming assume the duties of military assistance to secretary rumsfeld and worked daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years, and then upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon is deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense, and america security affairs but please join me in welcoming steve bucci. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of
describes the changes use by the u.s. military under the leadership of general david petraeus followed by our weekly afterwards program. john mackey's book is conscious capitalism. we conclude tonight's prime-time programming at 11:00 eastern with james votes's book freedom national taking a look at slavery 1861-1865. visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> next on booktv, barbara matusow, editor of scooped it recounts the life of her career pulitzer prize-winning reporter jack nelson who died in 2009 at the age of 80. barbara matusow is joined by former president jimmy carter, former mayor of atlanta and u.s. ambassador to the united nations andrew young and former justice department spokesman terry adamson. it is a discussion of jack nelson's memoir "scoop: the evolution of a southern reporter". it is about an hour. >> good evening, everyone, good to have everyone here. my name is hank klibanoff and i will be moderating this wonderful panel tonight, as director of the journalism program at emory and co-author of the book about coverage of the civil rights
portrays and his advisers transformed the u.s. military to fight future small wars against insurgents and terrorists. watch him for them for the next hour here on booktv. [applause] >> thank you. thanks for coming out. i write a column called war stories. the word wars in the subtitle of my luck but if you have read any of my things you will know i really don't write about the war. i don't write battle scenes. i am not one of these reporters who just aches to get back into some more theme where i can get shot at. i do admire those who do but it's just not what i do. what i'm interested in doing is policy and ideas and where do these ideas come from? they don't just drop from the sky. they usually do not automatically appeal to everybody as a matter of logic. where did the ideas come from? who were the people and there were a lot of comp eating ideas. how did this particular set of ideas get transferred? was there resistance? how was the resistance overcome? it usually isn't just one person. it's a community of people. how did this community form? will was the basis of a? tha
of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on book tv. >> thank you for that introduction and for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things on why i wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, bob gates the secretary of defense noted before he announced he was going to leave the administration that he was going to go back to the state of washington. this is someone i followed closely over the years. i testified against him in 1991 when he was nominated to be the cia director. and as an obama supporter of course i was shocked to find out who was crowned be kept on as obama secretary of defense but when he told people i found interesting and was the major reason i wanted to write this book and what he said was we are moving towards a smaller military that will do fewer things and be able to go fewer places which he felt was a terrible thing and he added i don't want to be a part of that kind of system that is going to retrench. my feeling has been we need a smaller military that will do fewer th
makes absolutely no sense. because we don't use that logic in any other part of our lives. if you went to a dry cleaner down the street and of every ten shirt that is you took them seven of them came back with a huge burn mark on them, what would you do? you'd stop going. what be the people said, wait, you can't stop giving us your business and your money because we need your money to be able to invest in new equipment and to train our employees. and if you take your business away, we're not going to be able to do that. what would you say? you'd say not with my shirts, buddy. so if we are willing to take that much care with our laundry, shouldn't we take at least that much care with our can kids? and not be willing to say, okay, let's continue to invest in this thing that has failed for generations and hope that maybe someday it may get better in meanwhile, our kids are not getting the skills that they need. it makes no sense. >> ladies and gentlemen, we're going to have to cut it there with the questions -- i'm sorry -- because, again, michelle has to go on piers morgan -- >> i t
, we'll have jeff engel come up and talk to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early morning hours of august 2nd, following negotiations and promises by iraq's dictator, hussein, not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invade it its trusting and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. within three days, 120,000 iraqi troops, with 850 tanks, had poured into kuwait and moved south to threaten saudi arabia. at my direction, elements of the 82nd airborne division, as well as key corrupt of the united states air force, are arriving today to take up defensive positions in saudi arabia. no one, friend or foe, should doubt or desire for peace, and no one should underestimate our determination to confront aggression. >> our objectives in the persian gulf are clear. our goals defined. and familiar. iraq must withdraw from kuwait completely immediately, and without condition. [applause] >> these goals are not ours alone. they've been endorsed by the united nations security council five times in as many weeks. most countries share our concern for principle, and many have a stake in the stability o
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
we have to take responsibility for educating ourselves in our own communities using the means we have of at our disposal. thank you. >> thank you. [applause] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us @booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> max boot presents a history of guerrilla warfare. the author poz its that unconventional warfare, often thought of as a modern means of war, has a long tradition that dates back to antiquity. this is a little under an hour. >> everybody got quiet. good afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our louis lehrman auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who are joining us on our heritage.org web site. for those in-house as we prepare to begin, please, make sure cell phones have been turned off. it is our courtesy our speakers do appreciate. we will post the program within 24 hours on our heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting our event today is steven bucci. dr. bucci is director of our dougallyson cent
to the constitution which abolished slavery in the u.s. jurisdiction these landmark documents of the freedom reside here at the national archives but they are filled with documents that tell the story of the emancipation of the individual level. the letter from a black soldier to the enslaved wife assures her there's a present national difficulties are great yet i look forward to a brighter day and the one asked president lincoln if she were signing the nitze push proclamation sadly the answer was no because she was in maryland, a border state unaffected by the decree. the first-person accounts of the slaves on sob files provide a window on to the world before and after the war. some talk of choosing a name tabare as a free person and others describe the long searches to reunite their families. milestones denied to and enslaved population, marriage, going to school now become popular for free people and our tremendous holdings that contains stories of the struggles and achievements. historians on the panel looked at the records and as other research institutions and the investigations we are lucky
. the policy of our country, foreign policy, all the instruments of power it that you use to frame a policy must be driven with some higher purpose. i mentioned purpose, we lost purpose. we have been about ricocheting crisis to crisis. there's no strategic thinking, hasn't been strategic thinking for a long time in our foreign policy. it is the point i keep making. so does dick lugar who is one of the most accomplished foreign policy thinkers in the country as i do joe biden, one of the best. they talked about this for years. you must frame a strategic context first and then you frame the policy to fit the strategic context, the national interest of your country. what john bose. millennium john's account. that was one of the more creative things we have done. it is bigger than that. until we get a president that does that, then is able to implement, by the way in partnership with the congress, doesn't mean the congress has to agree with everything but you can't treat article i of the constitution like it is an appendix, like it is a nuisance. if for no other reason you can't sustain a forei
you think of our programming this weekend. you can tweak us on booktv, comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail, booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> now on c-span2 we bring you booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books. here are some programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern, ben shapiro argues liberals believe their competition discouraging political debate. at 2:00 a.m. michele alexander opines that policies from the 70s for and acted to push back gains made during the civil-rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on immigration we bring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. sunday melvin goodman argues the government is spending excessively on defense making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for complete schedule visit booktv.org. up next on booktv cita stelzer talks about the dinner hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii which were used to persuade world leaders to adopt his position on variou
it is the responsibility of all of us but especially those who are in public service and have the public trust. and if we are to trespass on people's time, asking them to consider realizing what we -- reading what we put down, then we owe it to the readers, to the audience, to our constituents, to the country to, as my brother tom noted, have something to say. and i didn't ever really thought i had enough to say, maybe a chapter's worth, but i never thought a book. i've written a number of op eds over the years, a lot of articles, given a lot of speeches, but never a book. and until about a year and a half ago, and as i get around the world and listen and try to keep my receivers tuned on as much as my transmitter -- i think the world would be far better off if we had more receivers on than transmitters -- it struck me that with all the great issues and challenges that face our country in the world today, i'd never seen a summary that would connect these issues in a cogent way, that would frame the world and within the framing of the world and the issues and the challenges and the solutions, in a way tha
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